An Atlanta hospital was using bottled water Saturday after a main break on the Georgia Tech campus led to outages and a boil water advisory in the city.

Emory University Hospital Midtown turned to bottled water during the emergency but there weren't many procedures scheduled over the weekend, according to Vincent Dollard, a spokesman for Emory University's Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center.

Dollard said the water emergency had not affected patient care at the hospital, and that instruments needing sterilization will be transported to other hospitals.

The city issued a boil water advisory for all residents and businesses after the main break in northwest Atlanta.

Video posted to social media showed brownish water gushing from the ground on the campus.

The Department of Watershed Management called for immediate water restriction to critical uses only to allow the system to rebuild pressure, according to a statement.

The public was advised to boil water or use bottled water.

CNN has sought comment from Georgia Tech.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said via Twitter: "We are aware of problems throughout the city and crews are working to repair the issue. For those who still have service, a boil water advisory is in effect."

The Department of Watershed Management said on Twitter Saturday afternoon that it was investigating the 36-inch water main break following reports of outages.

The department was assessing the impacted area and system pressures, according to the tweet.

CNN reached out to the department for information on the number of affected households and businesses.

Correction: An earlier version of this article and its headline incorrectly said the hospital was using bottled water to sterilize instruments. Vincent Dollard, a spokesman for Emory University's Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center, later clarified to CNN that all instruments needing sterilization will be sent to other hospitals.

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